Tennessee Williams

Playwright



About

Thomas Lanier "Tennessee" Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983 - (aged 71)) was an American playwright. Along with Eugene O'Neill and Arthur Miller he is considered among the three foremost playwrights in 20th-century American drama. After years of obscurity, he became suddenly famous with The Glass Menagerie (1944), closely reflecting his own unhappy family background. This heralded a string of successes, including A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955), and Sweet Bird of Youth (1959). His later work attempted a new style that did not appeal to audiences, and alcohol and drug dependence further inhibited his creative output. His drama A Streetcar Named Desire is often numbered on the short list of the finest American plays of the 20th century alongside Long Day's Journey into Night and Death of a Salesman. Much of Williams' most acclaimed work was adapted for the cinema. He also wrote short stories, poetry, essays and a volume of memoirs. In 1979, four years before his death, Williams was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.<Br>Source:<A Href="Https://En.Wikipedia.Org/Wiki/Main_Page" Target="_blank" Rel="Me Nofollow">Https://En.Wikipedia.Org/Wiki/Main_Page</A>